Solomon Islands

Little is it known that surfers can find stoke in the Solomon Islands. With less than a 1,000 surfers visiting the Solomon Islands per annum and just a handful of local surfers, keen travellers will find no crowds on the intermediate to advanced reef breaks in a tropical, island paradise.

The Solomon Islands has surf reaching both north and south facing coastlines.

Southerly swells from the Coral Sea and swells generated by tropical depressions, cyclones and deep low pressure systems forming off the coast of Australia reach Gizo and Skull Island in the Western Province. Gizo is one of the better known surf regions in the Solomons due to its accessability and availability of accommodation options for surfers. When the swell is running, breaks pop up all over the area. Skull Island, near Munda, has the Solomon Islands’ longest right hander and a few other shallow reef breaks. However, the surf at Skull Island can be extremely fickle and inconsistent.

From November to April, long period ground swells that hit North Shore Hawaii pass through the Solomon Islands at reduced intensity. This ground swell lights up the north facing atolls including those around Malaita, Santa Isabel and Makira. The waves are generally around 3 – 6 foot, with occasional 10 footers popping up in the mix. Typhoons generated off Japan and the Philippines can also generate swell in these regions.